Methods for Building Employee Loyalty

The days of lifetime employment at a single company are long gone, so business leaders today need to make an extra effort to retain talent and foster employee loyalty.

Loyal employees are the heart of successful companies. When people feel fulfilled at their jobs, they go above and beyond to help the organization improve. They share expertise, resolve conflicts, suggest improvements, boost morale, help co-workers, conserve resources, and more. “Those behaviors make groups and organizations more effective — sales are better, production loss is lower, everything is better,” says Diane Bergeron, an assistant professor at Case Western’s Weatherhead School of Management in Cleveland.

To become one of those lucky companies, take time to understand what your employees need and provide it for them. “As in any relationship, if you get what you need, you’re more likely to stay,” Bergeron says.

Loyalty is largely inspired by flexibility and individual attention. These four techniques can help you offer that to every employee:

1. Invest more time in the hiring process. Hiring takes a lot of time, but a rigorous process pays off when you find the right person. “Person/organization fit is huge,” Bergeron says. “If you’re selective on the front end, you lose fewer people later.” Well-matched employees are naturally more loyal, so retaining them takes less effort.

As you hire, introduce the candidate to several people on your team, ask them to complete a project or share samples of past work, and screen for personality. “Make sure their values match the values of the organization,” Bergeron adds. A good match will blend naturally with the others on your team, rounding out their skills and fitting in with the overall culture.

2. Make your employees marketable. A good working relationship must be beneficial for both of you, meaning that employees need regular opportunities to enhance their professional skills. Many companies worry about investing too much in employees in case they leave, but you want to do just the opposite. “The more [employees] feel they can leave, the more likely they are to stay,” Bergeron says.

Managers are the most important source of growth and inspiration. “The relationship with the manager is the number one predictor of whether or not someone stays [at a job],” Bergeron says. Make sure your managers are trained to inspire their employees, share their expertise, and offer opportunities for growth.

3. Allow many paths to promotion. Your employees’ needs are ever evolving, so you can help them grow and inspire loyalty by offering opportunities for advancement tailored to their skills and goals. For example, many computer programmers want to move up without shifting into management, so tech companies often offer a choice between a technical or managerial career path.

Go one step further by helping an employee create a new job based on their skill set, or allowing them to rotate between different roles. “If people have the flexibility to tailor their job to their needs, they’re less likely to leave to find what they need,” Bergeron says.

4. Empower employees to make choices. Inspire loyalty by giving employees a sense of freedom and control. “When people feel that they’re trusted, they respond to that,” Bergeron says. You might let employees work from home when needed, make decisions autonomously, or adjust their work schedule to balance family. Those freedoms show confidence and help employees tailor the job to their needs.

“Trust is this basic component of society,” Bergeron says. “Without it, [organizations] cease to function.” Trusting companies have less rigid management, greater creativity, and higher employee satisfaction. They also inspire employees to go above and beyond, making the workplace better for everyone.

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THINGS WE ALL CAN DO TO RECYCLE

  • RESUSE
  • Use both sides of your paper before recycling it.
  • Purchase used items when possible instead of buying new ones.
  • Have broken items repaired before buying a new item
  • Sell or donate items instead of throwing them away.
  • Encourage use of non-disposable plates, silverware, and glasses in your school or work cafeteria
  • Send old shoes back to companies like Nike to be reused

THINK GREEN!!!!

THINK GREEN

Facts About the Environmental Impact of Printer Cartridges
It takes about a gallon of oil to make a new laser cartridge.
Almost 8 cartridges are thrown away per second in the United States alone!
In North America alone, over 350 million cartridges per year are discarded in our landfills, and that number increases by 12 percent annually!
Every remanufactured laser cartridge saves nearly 2.5 pounds of metal & plastic waste from being deposited in landfills.
A laser cartridge thrown into landfill can take up to 450 years to decompose. Some components made of industrial grade plastics will take over a thousand years to decompose.
70 percent of used printer cartridges throughout the world are currently being thrown out.
In one year, if the world’s discarded cartridges were stacked end-to-end; they would circle the earth over three times.
We Can Make a Difference!

Every single cartridge saved from a landfill makes a difference. This will not only protect our environment but save consumers thousands of dollars. Now imagine the difference when individuals, then organizations, then cities, then states and then nations start participating! That is Impact with Effect! At Cartridge World we are not only making a difference, we are changing the world!

Did You Know? 
Most printer cartridges can be refilled or remanufactured.
By bringing your used cartridges to Cartridge World, you can help protect our environment, and save substantially compared to the cost of a new cartridge!
Cartridge World is dedicated to saving consumers, businesses, and the planet!

ENVIRONMENTAL RECYCLING BENEFITS

Recycling and composting diverted nearly 70 million tons of material away from landfills and incinerators in 2000, up from 34 million tons in 1990-doubling in just 10 years.
Every ton of paper that is recycled saves 17 trees.

The energy we save when we recycle one glass bottle is enough to light a light bulb for four hours.

Recycling benefits the air and water by creating a net reduction in ten major categories of air pollutants and eight major categories of water pollutants.

In the U.S., processing minerals contributes almost half of all reported toxic emissions from industry, sending 1.5 million tons of pollution into the air and water each year. Recycling can significantly reduce these emissions.

It is important to reduce our reliance on foreign oil. Recycling helps us do that by saving energy.

Manufacturing with recycled materials, with very few exceptions, saves energy and water and produces less air and water pollution than manufacturing with virgin materials.

It takes 95% less energy to recycle aluminum than it does to make it from raw materials. Making recycled steel saves 60%, recycled newspaper 40%, recycled plastics 70%, and recycled glass 40%. These savings far outweigh the energy created as by-products of incineration and landfilling.

In 2000, recycling resulted in an annual energy savings equal to the amount of energy used in 6 million homes (over 660 trillion BTUs). In 2005, recycling is conservatively projected to save the amount of energy used in 9 million homes (900 trillion BTUs).

A national recycling rate of 30% reduces greenhouse gas emissions as much as removing nearly 25 million cars from the road.

Recycling conserves natural resources, such as timber, water, and minerals.

Every bit of recycling makes a difference. For example, one year of recycling on just one college campus, Stanford University, saved the equivalent of 33,913 trees and the need for 636 tons of iron ore, coal, and limestone.

Recycled paper supplies more than 37% of the raw materials used to make new paper products in the U.S. Without recycling, this material would come from trees. Every ton of newsprint or mixed paper recycled is the equivalent of 12 trees. Every ton of office paper recycled is the equivalent of 24 trees.

When one ton of steel is recycled, 2,500 pounds of iron ore, 1,400 pounds of coal and 120 pounds of limestone are conserved.

Brutal wars over natural resources, including timber and minerals, have killed or displaced more than 20 million people and are raising at least $12 billion a year for rebels, warlords, and repressive governments. Recycling eases the demand for the resources.

Mining is the world’s most deadly occupation. On average, 40 mine workers are killed on the job each day, and many more are injured. Recycling reduces the need for mining.

Tree farms and reclaimed mines are not ecologically equivalent to natural forests and ecosystems.

Recycling prevents habitat destruction, loss of biodiversity, and soil erosion associated with logging and mining.

GOING GREEN WITH RECYCLING

Well-run recycling programs cost less to operate than waste collection, landfilling, and incineration.

The more people recycle, the cheaper it gets.

Two years after calling recycling a $40 million drain on the city, New York City leaders realized that a redesigned, efficient recycling system could actually save the city $20 million and they have now signed a 20-year recycling contract.

Recycling helps families save money, especially in communities with pay-as-you-throw programs.

Well-designed programs save money. Communities have many options available to make their programs more cost-effective, including maximizing their recycling rates, implementing pay-as-you-throw programs, and including incentives in waste management contracts that encourage disposal companies to recycle more and dispose of less.

Recycling creates 1.1 million U.S. jobs, $236 billion in gross annual sales and $37 billion in annual payrolls.

Public sector investment in local recycling programs pays great dividends by creating private sector jobs. For every job collecting recyclables, there are 26 jobs in processing the materials and manufacturing them into new products.

Recycling creates four jobs for every one job created in the waste management and disposal industries.

Thousands of U.S. companies have saved millions of dollars through their voluntary recycling programs. They wouldn’t recycle if it didn’t make economic sense.

Print Green: Save the Planet and Money

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Cartridge World’s Michael Davis Provides Green Solutions

For months Michael Davis prepared for the opening of his franchise with the world’s reportedly largest retailer of printer cartridge refills.

He found the perfect spot in the upscale Camp Creek Marketplace center on Camp Creek Parkway. He researched the market, finding out which cartridges were the top sellers.

His inventory stacked; his employees in place, Davis opened Cartridge World, at 3645 Marketplace Blvd., in November 2010, hoping to capture a customer base that was ready for cheaper cartridges that provided the same top quality.

“Everyone is a potential customer,” Davis, 45, said. “If you are on the planet you probably have a printer, a postage machine and you’re probably going to run out of ink.”

As the employees rang up the prices, mouths dropped, eyes widened. Customers were looking at savings of up to $10 or more on cartridges.

Many had never heard of Cartridge World and now they knew they would never forget it.

“We can get anything you want in a day or two,” Davis said. “We have more on the shelf than most stores do and unlike other stores we will find it for you.”

But something went wrong.

And Davis soon realized he had made one of the biggest mistakes in his new career.

He had misread his market.

The youngest son of a retired elementary school teacher and a former CDC executive, Davis was a technology man.

For 21 years, Davis remained loyal to the same computer company, which changed names and owners three times before laying off Davis’ division. The drop came almost a week after Davis graduated with an MBA degree from Emory University.

It was time to move on to a new career, and one day Davis stumbled into one.

Looking for cartridges for his Laser printer, Davis chose a Cartridge World in Decatur. He saved $19.66 by buying refills.

“I used a couple of them and realized there were no differences in them.”

Excited, Davis saw a business opportunity. Anyone who owned a printer, a fax, a postage machine or copier needed ink cartridges.

That amounted to millions of customers including college students, business owners and teachers.

And with the economy in the tank, Davis knew many would be looking for good deals.

A week later, he received another boost.

It was at a networking meeting.

Among a sea of suits, the man was easily the most calm and relaxed one in the room. Davis had to meet him. The man, it turned out, knew a lot about the cartridge refill business. He was the owner of the Cartridge World in Decatur, the same store where Davis bought his refills.

Armed with more Information, Davis began his research. He approached the company about opening a franchise. They wanted one in Henry County. But Davis balked at the idea. He had no desire to stray so far from his Sandtown home, his church and his community.

With more than 650 stores in North America, 1,700 stores worldwide and 59 locations in Georgia and Tennessee, there were still many areas that were under-served. And despite the market for one, Davis realized that Cartridge Worlds weren’t traditionally placed in urban areas.

His store would be the only one in South Fulton.

Davis attempted to get a loan, but a year ago many banks weren’t funding startups and they weren’t lending to small businesses. He dipped into his retirement funds.

With its cream-colored walls, carpeted interior and comfortable black chairs, Davis had turned the store into a clean, warm and inviting setting: a place where relationships can foster.

Shortly after opening, about 15 people who had already bought cartridges at the neighboring Staples saw the sale sign and stopped in.

“They wanted to do a price check,” Davis said. “As we rang up the prices, their mouths dropped.”

Davis smiled. They returned the cartridges to Staples and became Cartridge World customers.

The store was off to a good start, but soon Davis began to realize his customers were primarily retailers who used inkjet printers. He had stacked his shelves with toners for laser printers based on the supplier’s data on the top selling cartridges.

“That was the biggest mistake. What one store sells is completely different from another store,” Davis said. He was seated behind a glass desk with the word “Love” written in several languages. “What one put on sale in one store is completely different from what they put on sale across town.”

More than eight months later, Davis still had not sold the laser toners for brands such as HP, Dell, Brothers and Lexmark. He was losing money.

The store’s customers were 70 percent retailers and 30 percent business owners.

In order to prosper, Davis was acutely aware that he needed more business customers, which will mean a more consistent clientele, larger orders and a steady stream of revenue.

He needed more customers like Jason Wright with LensCrafters. The manager had stopped buying his cartridges at Staples once he found out Cartridge World had a better deal.

“It’s a lot cheaper,” Wright said. “I saved $10 for each cartridge.”

Davis, who was a member of various networking and business organizations, decided on a gimmick: lollipops. His three employees quickly showed their distaste for the idea. But Davis believes in giving the customers what they like.

And they liked the lollipops.

Each shipment contained lollipops. There was a lollipop for each box. Still, some customers wanted extra.

A month ago, when a lady dropped in upset, Davis offered her a lollipop. He watched her unwrapped the cherry bubble on a stick and 30 seconds later it was like magic. The woman smiled.

“It takes people back to a time when it was simpler, easier and more fun,” Davis said.

“It’s about the customer,” Davis said. “Cartridge world is a people business more than a technology business.”

And he believes every customer should be treated like a grandmother, with reverence and respect.

Manager Anika Glenn, a former flight attendant, likes retail.

She smiled one Thursday when a woman and her son came in searching for ink for the woman’s computer. The two was just passing by when they saw the sale sign posted on the store’s glass front.

“Will it mess up my printer?” the woman wanted to know.

It was the most popular concern among their customers.

“It may not work, but it can’t mess up your printer,” Glenn told the woman. About 5 percent of customers using recycled cartridge returned them because they won’t work in their printers, Glenn said.

Some recycle cartridges won’t work in some brands of Lexmark and Canon.

Glenn said she does about five refills a day, spending 15 minutes to refill, test, reseal and re-package each cartridge.

“It’s the ultimate in green, we are reusing cartridges,” Davis said. “We are diverting them from going to landfills.”

Of the 205.5 million computer products disposed of in the U.S. in 2007, 157.3 million were trashed while the remaining 48.2 million were recycled, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

“We are teaching people about green and sustainability,” Davis said. “You can reuse an ink cartridge up to five or more times.”

Green solutions will be tremendously more important five years from now, Davis said.

But Davis didn’t want to just stop with selling recycling ink cartridges. He opened up a recycling program, allowing residents to drop off computer equipments and other electronics at the store.

Betty Pritchett saw the store’s announcement online at www.Cascade.Patch.com and dropped off her old computer.

“There is not a permanent place to drop things off in south Fulton,” Davis said.

Still, driven by the customers’ needs, Davis also started a computer repair program. He sells computers and papers along with regular ink cartridges; and soon customers will also be able to do some light copying.

“I want to be able to do full service here. That’s when it becomes a full-solution store.”

Davis spend hours attending mixers, breakfast and brunches. He understands the need for networking. He helps with fundraisers and community cleanup programs. He understands the importance of being involved in the community.

Still, the small white desk and little matching chair in the corner of the store’s break room showed Davis understand something else as well.

That area was reserved for his 3-year-old daughter, Blake. She had the place set up with her toys and books for when her father brings her to the store on weekends. It was her office in the store she proudly called, “Our store.”

Davis takes her to daycare in the mornings and was home almost every evening to give her a bath. Sitting on a chair with her legs propped over his shoulder, he would read her stories. Then it was time for bed, at least for Blake. For Davis, it was back to work.

“The retail business is a hard business and you have to work all the time,” Davis said. “People who know me are used to getting emails from me from 10 at night to 2 or 3 in the mornings.”

The husband and father, who loves to travel and dabbles in photography, looks forward to a time when sales are profitable and consistent, when things can run smoothly in his absence and when he can spend his time as he wants.

But that will have to wait. He has a business to grow, and a stock of laser toners to sell.365 Days of Saving