RECYCLE: REUSE INK CARTRIDGES WITH CARTRIDGE WORLD CAMPCREEK

Despite their best efforts, many towns and municipalities have been unable to coax their residents to recycle more than 30% of their waste stream [1]. The problem presented is twofold – some items can simply not be recycled – their design is inherently flawed; other items can be recycled, but it is not convenient to do so. These may be items which the town does not collect directly (batteries and e-waste often fall into this category), and may have to be sent to a transfer station for proper recycling.  Oftentimes, the consumer is away from home when the recyclable item is purchased and used – soft drink plastic bottles and aluminum cans are some examples.

It is important to recycle items even when it is not convenient. Each plastic bottle that is thrown out will spend eternity in a landfill – or worse, it may make its way to our rivers or oceans, where it will join with other floating pieces of plastic in the growing “oceanic garbage patches” which are now found in every ocean on earth.

Many towns, schools and organizations now use single stream recycling, or zero-sort waste to deal with their recyclables. This vastly increases the ease with which people can recycle – in addition, single-stream recycling usually accepts a greater variety of products.  Other tools to boost recycling include banning the pickup of recyclables in the trash, or charging for pickup of trash, while keeping recycling free.

Extended Producer Responsibility or EPR, puts the responsibility for recycling of products back on the companies that produced the product in the first place. This is an excellent practice, since it starts producers thinking about the end life of a product, as well as discouraging the practice of producing disposable or cheap goods.

 

MAKE YOUR WASTE ENERGY

Waste to energy means producing energy from burning trash, and is the least ideal option in our waste-management circle. If done intelligently, waste to energy plants can reduce the volume of garbage going into a landfill by 90% [1], and recoup some of the energy present in the trash. Irresponsible waste incineration, however, can make the toxins present in trash both more mobile and more lethal, further exacerbating the problem of what to do with what we throw away.

Waste to energy still sends some materials – usually ash – to a landfill, where most of our trash is still being buried. Landfills are fraught with environmental problems. These include household and industrial wastes leaking into the ground and contaminating our food and drinking water, the release of greenhouse gasses such as methane, and the permanent loss of valuable materials and nutrients – many of which were just recently dug up out of the ground. The limited and leaky nature of landfills only highlights the old adage – There is no such place as away.

 

THINGS WE ALL CAN DO TO RECYCLE

  • RESUSE
  • Use both sides of your paper before recycling it.
  • Purchase used items when possible instead of buying new ones.
  • Have broken items repaired before buying a new item
  • Sell or donate items instead of throwing them away.
  • Encourage use of non-disposable plates, silverware, and glasses in your school or work cafeteria
  • Send old shoes back to companies like Nike to be reused

LET’S REUSE PRODUCTS WHERE WE CAN!!!

Americans produce a staggering 1600 pounds of trash per person per year. The majority of this trash comes from “durable goods” [1].  Durable goods are what we think of as “stuff” – radios, dvd players, toys, furniture, clothes – all the things that we buy which are often discarded before the end of their useful life.

Reusing materials contributes to a twofold gain – the item doesn’t head to the landfill andthere is no need to purchase a new product.  Furthermore, reusing an item is better than recycling because the process of recycling takes a good deal of energy.

The used clothing store, the second-hand bookshop, and the reclaimed building supply shop all are great examples of places to either purchase or drop off used goods. Often these options are both less expensive for you, as well as less expensive for the planet.

 

REFILL YOUR INK CARTRIDGES…SAVE MONEY!!!

Inkjet refills are much cheaper than purchasing new inkjet cartridges each time your ink runs out. If you have an inkjet printer and you do a lot of printing whether it is for home or business use you will know that replacing the cartridges can be a costly business. Inkjet refills can help save you a fortune if you get through a lot of ink. Companies that offer inkjet refills and printer ink refills will be able to refill most major brands of cartridges. They will sell printer ink refills to you and recycle your old empty ink cartridges.

This also helps to save the environment as there is much less waste produced if you refill your old cartridges compared to if everybody just threw them away and bought new ones every time. Many companies will sell universal ink that says it will work in any manufacturer’s cartridge but this may not be the best option. Good quality inkjet refills will include a priming tool and these are not commonly available with most generic printer ink refills. Good suppliers will sell inkjet refills that are for specific brands of printer such as HP, Lexmark or Hewlett Packard. Different brands use different ink formulations so good inkjet refills will be created so they are the same ink formulation as the original to produce just as good quality printing results.

Cartridge World Campcreek uses only the best ink and the highest quality of EVERYTHING!!!

http://www.atlinkrefill.com
404-629-5200

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