National Organ Donor Day

National Organ Donor Day encourages people to sign up to donate their organs. It may save a life.

Sure, it is uncomfortable to think of our own death, especially an early one. But, if it was to happen, you could save other lives . So, please consider seriously signing up to donate your organs and tissue.

Most deceased organ donations are anonymous. Donated organs and tissues from deceased donors are provided to patients based on need, blood type, genetic match and other factors.

You can choose to donate all of your organs and tissues – or simply select specific ones.

If you were gravely ill, your doctor’s first priority would be to save your life. Organ donation is only considered after all attempts to save your life have been made.

At the time a decision is being made, your medical history would be discussed with your family, and your organs tested. Donated organs that are not suitable for transplant may be used for scientific and other medical purposes.

Lend a hand…BECOME AN ORGAN DONOR!!!

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February, 2013 Bizarre and Unique Holidays

Month:

American Heart Month
An Affair to Remember Month
Black History Month
Canned Food Month
Creative Romance Month
Great American Pie Month
National Cherry Month
National Children’s Dental Health Month
National Grapefruit Month
National Weddings Month

Weekly Celebrations:

3rd Week International Flirting Week

February 2013 Daily Holidays, Special and Wacky Days:

1 National Freedom Day

2 Ground Hog Day

2 Candlemas

3 The Day the Music Died – Buddy Holly, Richie Valens and the Big Bopper died in a plane crash in 1959.

4 Create a Vacuum Day

4 Thank a Mailman Day

5 National Weatherman’s Day

6 Lame Duck Day

7 Wave All you Fingers at Your Neighbor Day

7 Send a Card to a Friend Day – obviously created by a card company

7 Winter Olympics – Not until 2014

8 Boy Scout Day – celebrates the birthday of scouting

8 Kite Flying Day – in the middle of winter!?!

9 Toothache Day

10 Umbrella Day

11 Clean out Your Computer Day – second Monday of Month

11 Don’t Cry over Spilled Milk Day

11 Make a Friend Day

11 White T-Shirt Day

12 Abraham Lincoln’s Birthday

12 Plum Pudding Day

13 Get a Different Name Day

14 Ferris Wheel Day

14 National Organ Donor Day

14 Valentine’s Day

15 Candlemas – on the Julian Calendar

15 National Gum Drop Day

15 Singles Awareness Day

16 Do a Grouch a Favor Day

17 Random Acts of Kindness Day

18 National Battery Day

18 President’s Day – third Monday of month

19 National Chocolate Mint Day

20 Cherry Pie Day

20 Hoodie Hoo Day

20 Love Your Pet Day

21 Card Reading Day

22 George Washington’s Birthday

22 Be Humble Day

22 Walking the Dog Day

22 International World Thinking Day

23 International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day

23 Tennis Day

24 National Tortilla Chip Day

25 Pistol Patent Day

26 Carnival Day

26 National Pistachio Day – it’s a nutty day!

26 Tell a Fairy Tale Day

27 Polar Bear Day

27 No Brainer Day – this day is for me!

28 Floral Design Day

28 Public Sleeping Day

28 National Tooth Fairy Day – and/or August 22

29 Leap Day – not until 2016, once every four years

Charles Richard Drew – African American History

Charles Richard Drew was born on June 3, 1904 in Washington, D.C. He was an African-American physician who developed ways to process and store blood plasma in “blood banks.” He directed the blood plasma programs of the United States and Great Britain in World War II, but resigned after a ruling that the blood of African Americans would be segregated. He died in 1950.

A pioneering African-American medical researcher, Dr. Charles R. Drew made some groundbreaking discoveries in the storage and processing of blood for transfusions. He also managed two of the largest blood banks during World War II. Drew grew up in Washington, D.C., as the oldest son of a carpet layer.

In his youth, Drew showed great athletic talent. He won several medals for swimming in his elementary years, and later branched out to football, basketball and other sports. After graduating from Dunbar High School in 1922, Drew went to Amherst College on a sports scholarship. There, he distinguished himself on the track and football teams.

Drew completed his bachelor’s degree at Amherst in 1926, but didn’t have enough money to pursue his dream of attending medical school. He worked as a biology instructor and a coach for Morgan College, now Morgan State University, in Baltimore for two years. In 1928, he applied to medical schools and enrolled at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.

At McGill University, Drew quickly proved to be a top student. He won a prize in neuroanatomy and was a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha, a medical honor society. Graduating in 1933, Drew was second in his class and earned both Doctor of Medicine and Master of Surgery degrees. He did his internship and residency at the Royal Victoria Hospital and the Montreal General Hospital. During this time, Drew studied with Dr. John Beattie, and they examined problems and issues regarding blood transfusions.

After his father’s death, Drew returned to the United States. He became an instructor at Howard University‘s medical school in 1935. The following year, he did a surgery residence at Freedmen’s Hospital in Washington, D.C., in addition to his work at the university.

Father of Blood Banks

In 1938, Drew received a Rockefeller Fellowship to study at Columbia University and train at the Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. There, he continued his exploration of blood-related matters with John Scudder. Drew developed a method for processing and preserving blood plasma, or blood without cells. Plasma lasts much longer than whole blood, making it possible to be stored or “banked” for longer periods of time. He discovered that the plasma could be dried and then reconstituted when needed. His research served as the basis of his doctorate thesis, “Banked Blood,” and he received his doctorate degree in 1940. Drew became the first African American to earn this degree from Columbia.

As World War II raged in Europe, Drew was asked to head up a special medical effort known as “Blood for Britain.” He organized the collection and processing of blood plasma from several New York hospitals, and the shipments of these life-saving materials overseas to treat causalities in the war.

According to one report, Drew helped collect roughly 14,500 pints of plasma.

In 1941, Drew worked on another blood bank effort, this time for the American Red Cross. He worked on developing a blood bank to be used for U.S. military personnel. But not long into his tenure there, Drew became frustrated with the military’s request for segregating the blood donated by African Americans. At first, the military did not want to use blood from African Americans, but they later said it could only be used for African-American soldiers. Drew was outraged by this racist policy, and resigned his post after only a few months.

After creating two of the first blood banks, Drew returned to Howard University in 1941. He served as a professor there, heading up the university’s department of surgery. He also became the chief surgeon at Freedmen’s Hospital. Later that year, he became the first African-American examiner for the American Board of Surgery.

In 1944, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People honored Drew with its 1943 Spingarn Medal for “the highest and noblest achievement” by an African American “during the preceding year or years.” The award was given in recognition of Drew’s blood plasma collection and distribution efforts.

For the final years of his life, Drew remained an active and highly regarded medical professional. He continued to serve as the chief surgeon at Freedmen’s Hospital and a professor at Howard University. On April 1, 1950, Drew and three other physicians attended a medical conference at the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama. Drew was behind the wheel when his vehicle crashed near Burlington, South Carolina. His passengers survived, but Drew later succumbed to his injuries. He left behind his wife, Minnie, and their four children.

Drew was only 45 years old at the time of his death, and it is remarkable how much he was able to accomplish in such a limited amount of time. As the Reverend Jerry Moore said at Drew’s funeral, Drew had “a life which crowds into a handful of years’ significance, so great, men will never be able to forget it.”

Since his passing, Drew has received countless posthumous honors. He was featured in the United States Postal Service’s Great Americans stamp series in 1981, and his name appears on educational institutions across the country.